Carry The One Radio: The Science Podcast

Carry The One Radio: The Science Podcast

Synopsis

Carry the One Radio - Igniting Scientific Curiosity--Follow us @CTORadio--To support the show: www.patreon.com/carrytheone. --More science and podcast fun on our website: http://www.ctoradio.org

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Episodes

  • Making Sense of Antisense Oligonucleotides
    Making Sense of Antisense Oligonucleotides
    Duration: 29min | 14/10/2019

    How does a potential drug discovered in the lab ultimately end up in people? We tackle this question in the context of exciting gene-modifying therapies called antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs). In this episode, we speak with Dr. Tim Miller to break down the science behind ASOs and learn more about his work in finding a cure for a genetic form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). This episode was written and produced by Nancy Cai, Devika Nair, and Arja Ray. Music used in this episode: “Thannoid”, “Bundt”, “Lupi”, “Partly Sage”, “Beignet”, “Trailrunner”, “Game Hens”, “Lord Weasel”, “The Zeppelin”, “Dorica”, “Our Fingers Cold”, “Gaena” by Blue Dot Sessions For more information about spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), check out the spinal muscular dystrophy association website: https://www.mda.org/disease/spinal-muscular-atrophy. There is also this great animation that shows how the Spinraza (nusinersen) ASO works in the body: https://www.spinraza.com/en_us/home/taking/how-spinraza-works.html. To read th

  • The Mosquito Menace
    The Mosquito Menace
    Duration: 39min | 19/09/2019

    Did you know that mosquitoes kill over 700,000 people a year? They are the most dangerous animal in the world. How can they be stopped?! In this episode, we spoke with a variety of experts that are working on mosquito vector control in the Caribbean and Latin America. The common theme is that it is essential to educate community members about the risks of mosquitoes and actions that they can take to reduce mosquito breeding. An educated community is much more engaged to take actions to prevent mosquito borne diseases like Zika and dengue. We also spoke to the World Mosquito Program about their research on infecting mosquitoes with a harmless bacteria called Wolbachia that prevents the mosquitoes from being able to spread disease. Although progress is being made, it will take a lot of money, resources, and new technology to eliminate the spread of mosquito-borne diseases. You can check out the USAID Zika photo exhibit, which featured clips from some of the interviews in this episode, at https://spark.adobe.

  • Whatever Happened with Zika?
    Whatever Happened with Zika?
    Duration: 28min | 03/09/2019

    You probably haven’t heard much about the Zika epidemic in the last few years – whatever happened with Zika? In this episode, we follow the history of Zika – from its origins, to the widespread epidemic of 2015-2016, to the personal impact it had on those who were affected, to its disappearance, and to the possibility of preventing a future Zika epidemic through a vaccine. We spoke with Dalma Contina Soto, a mother of a child born with congenital Zika syndrome; Dr. Josefina Coloma, an epidemiologist who studies the Zika virus and works to prevent mosquito-borne diseases in Nicaragua; and Dr. Anna Durbin, an infectious disease specialist who tests potential vaccines for Zika and Dengue. To listen to the original Spanish audio of Dalma’s interview, head to soundcloud.com/carrytheoneradio and look for the playlist “Zika miniseries – Spanish audio”. Some of this content was originally featured as an audio companion to a USAID photo exhibit detailing efforts to combat Zika in Latin America and the Caribbean. To

  • SynGRing in the Rain
    SynGRing in the Rain
    Duration: 22min | 05/08/2019

    The genome is like the encyclopedia to our body. With all that information, how does each cell know what part of the genome to read out at the right place and right time? That’s where transcription factors come to play. In this episode, we’ll learn how transcription factors prevent eyeballs from growing in our bellies! We will also hear from Dr. Aseem Ansari as he speaks about his work on creating synthetic transcription factors, SynGRs, and how these molecules could be used in future therapies. This episode was written and produced by Devika Nair, Nancy Cai, and Arja Ray. Music used in this episode: “Picnic March”, “Filing Away”, “Tiny Putty”, “Borough”, “Beignet”, “Trailrunner”, “Lovers Hollow”, “Highway 94”, “Dangerous Swing”, “Curio” by Blue Dot Sessions.

  • New episodes coming soon!
    New episodes coming soon!
    Duration: 01min | 04/08/2019

    Hey! Sorry we didn't have an episode out in July, but we have been hard at work creating our next season of episodes. We'll be talking about the Zika virus, how to stop mosquitoes from spreading disease, how to use molecules to turn genes on and off, black holes, brain development, and more! Plus, we'll be starting our Young Scientists Spotlight series to highlight the work done by graduate students and postdocs towards scientific advancement. Episodes will be dropping on the first Monday of each month, plus occasional bonus episodes mid-month. See you soon, and stay curious!

  • CRISPR: The Unauthorized Biography
    CRISPR: The Unauthorized Biography
    Duration: 35min | 03/06/2019

    This month, we discuss one of the biggest buzzwords in science today: CRISPR. This gene-editing tool has gotten a lot of attention for some ...ethically dubious uses, but before we humans got our hands on it, CRISPR was actually one of nature’s inventions. Since its discovery, CRISPR has been widely adapted as an incredibly effective research tool, but we’re still working to understand its biology -- and its limitations. In this episode, you’ll hear from Dr. Joseph Bondy-Denomy, who researches the evolutionary arms race that led to CRISPR, and Dr. Martin Kampmann, who uses CRISPR as a tool to study disease.

  • San Francisco and HIV: The Place Where it Happened
    San Francisco and HIV: The Place Where it Happened
    Duration: 50min | 17/04/2019

    In the early 80s, a new disease appeared in San Francisco, baffling scientists and alarming the public. Since then, our understanding of HIV/AIDS has made enormous strides, with treatments and prevention making leaps and bounds too. However, these advances haven't reached everyone quite yet. In a live recording, we speak to five people who have been instrumental in shaping HIV/AIDS treatment, policy, and care in San Francisco and abroad, and ask them about the barriers that still remain today. Recorded during a live event at UCSF Alumni Weekend. Hosted by Ben Mansky and Anna Lipkin Written and produced by Ben Mansky, Anna Lipkin, Katie Cabral, Stephanie Wankowicz, Liron Noiman, and Yiqi Cao Music in this episode: Thought Bubbles by Lee Rosevere String in a Box Hundred Mile by Blue Dot Sessions Episode Art courtesy of UCSF Archives AIDS History Project

  • The Pseudoscience Episode
    The Pseudoscience Episode
    Duration: 51min | 25/03/2019

    Pseudoscience: we know it when we see it, right? Or do we? On this episode of Carry the One Radio, we tackle the dirtiest word in science with the help of science historian Dr. Michael Gordin. Hear a few of our favorite pseudoscience stories, and see how pseudoscience can help us define the sometimes fuzzy borders of science. Plus, we discuss what to do about all that pesky pseudoscience floating around. Buckle up, it’s the Pseudoscience Episode. Hosted and Produced by Anna Lipkin, Devika Nair, and Liron Noiman Music used in this episode: "Filaments", "Curious Process" and "The Ascent" by Podington Bear "Transitioning" by Lee Rosevere "Bastien und Bastienne", "Adagio for Glass Armonica in C Major" and "Laudate Dominum" by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart "Lupi" and "Chicken Steak" by Blue Dot Sessions

  • Gene Cartography: Routes to Tourette Disorder
    Gene Cartography: Routes to Tourette Disorder
    Duration: 33min | 19/02/2019

    From Google Maps to John Snow’s map of cholera cases in the 1800s, maps have the power to change the way we understand information. What if we could use maps of cellular function to discover the mechanisms of psychiatric disorders? We sit down with Dr. Jeremy Willsey, a researcher in the Psychiatric Cell Map Initiative, who’s trying to do just that—understand the neural basis of Tourette Disorder by placing disorder-related mutations on a map of the cell. Hosted by Carlos Johnson-Cruz and Li Wang Produced by Anna Lipkin, Stephanie Wankowicz, Li Wang, and Carlos Johnson-Cruz Editing Help from the CTOR team Music used in this episode: “Scenery” and “Ode to the World” by Kai Engel “Bathed in Light” and “Unanswered Questions” by Kevin MacLeod “Frogs in Tuxes” and “Sweet and Clean” by Podington Bear “Ragtime Dance” by Scott Joplin

  • The Robin Hood of Data Science
    The Robin Hood of Data Science
    Duration: 21min | 08/01/2019

    If you stop to think about it, the amount of data we generate every day is truly mind-blowing - so much so that it's changing the way we live. In fact, our ability to quantify and measure large biological datasets has revolutionized the way we study and treat human diseases. In this episode, we speak to Dr. Atul Butte, who exploits these massive, publicly-available datasets to create novel and effective therapies for those in need. Music in this episode includes: Blue Dot Sessions: Borough, Beignet, Game Hens, The Zeppelin, Hundred Mile, Lord Weasel, Dorica Podington Bear: Cascades, Window Shopping, Daydreamer Musick's Recreation, Milena Cord-to-Krax: Gavotte (BWV 995)

  • Heart to Heart with Dan Hart
    Heart to Heart with Dan Hart
    Duration: 27min | 30/11/2018

    The heart is an extremely complicated organ, and believe it or not, everyone has one! But how does this vital organ come to be? By studying how a stem cell makes the decision to become a heart cell, Dr. Daniel Hart is trying to figure that out, and he’s using fish to do it. Check out this episode for some pretty terrible puns, fascinating facts about zebrafish, and an extended metaphor about gene regulation that will make you want to reach for the liquor cabinet. Music from Podington Bear on the Free Music Archive, and sound effects from users agonda and philberts on Freesound.com.

  • The Hitchhikers Guide to Immunotherapy
    The Hitchhiker's Guide to Immunotherapy
    Duration: 21min | 12/10/2018

    Dr. Liz Wayne got her start as a cancer hunter, searching for rogue cells running loose through the bloodstream. But she started to notice something strange – everywhere she found cancer cells, she found immune cells, too. Today, a big issue with cancer therapy is that some cancer sites are really hard to reach, but immune cells have no problem getting there. Dr. Wayne thought, why not hitchhike cancer-fighting drugs onto immune cells to get them straight to the places they’re needed most? Listen to this month’s episode to find out how her research may pave the way for a cheaper, more accessible kind of cancer immunotherapy. Plus, stick around after the credits to hear the origin story of Dr. Wayne’s podcast, PhDivas.

  • TIPping the Scales: Contagious Therapy Against HIV
    TIPping the Scales: Contagious Therapy Against HIV
    Duration: 29min | 13/09/2018

    Sharing is caring - so what if you could transmit your HIV therapy to someone else? In this episode, we talked to Dr. Leor Weinberger, whose team has invented TIPs, or Therapeutic Interfering Particles, that are mutant, shortened forms of HIV that cannot replicate on their own and cannot cause disease. In cells that contain HIV, these TIPs outcompete HIV, preventing it from replicating. These TIPs could then be spread from person to person through the same ways that HIV is transmitted. This therapy could go a long way towards fighting the barriers against disease control - adherence, access, and resistance. We thought this was a really unique idea that has the potential of reducing the population level of HIV, and we wanted to share this early-stage research with you.

  • Pitch Imperfect: The Quest to Improve the Bionic Ear
    Pitch Imperfect: The Quest to Improve the Bionic Ear
    Duration: 19min | 16/07/2018

    To date, cochlear implants are the most successful electronic device for restoring sensation in individuals with sensorineural hearing loss. Yet these devices are not without flaws. For instance, pitch perception is extremely poor in these devices, and that can affect an implant user's ability to distinguish sounds in a noisy room. In this episode, we speak to Dr. Charles Limb, a UCSF ear surgeon who specializes in hearing loss and performs these cochlear implant surgeries. By incorporating complex elements of music, Dr. Limb and his team hope to improve the current cochlear implant model so those with hearing loss have a wider range and more sensitive ability to hear.

  • Introduction: The Battle Against Viruses
    Introduction: The Battle Against Viruses
    Duration: 19min | 31/05/2018

    Dr. David Gordon studies HIV. In Life/Science, a new mini-series produced in collaboration with the UCSF Quantitative Biosciences Institute, we're giving you a peek behind the curtain. This isn't just a series about science, it's also about the process, about what it actually means to do this kind of research - including the confusion, failures, and triumphs David has faced along the way. Life/Science will be updated monthly, so make sure to tune in next month for Episode 2: Methods! We'll take a deep dive into the experiments David used to figure out how HIV hijacks human cells for its own nefarious purposes. If you like what you hear, leave us a comment or review! We'd love to hear from you. Music featured in this episode comes from Podington Bear.

  • Prescription Video Games: Level Up, Once Daily
    Prescription Video Games: Level Up, Once Daily
    Duration: 20min | 01/05/2018

    Pharmaceutical drugs for cognitive disorders are poorly targeted and can have adverse side effects. Could playing video games be an alternative therapy? We speak with Dr. Adam Gazzaley about his work on training the brains of patients using video games, and the effects on this training on their lives outside the game.

  • Implants and IUDs: A Renaissance of Birth Control
    Implants and IUDs: A Renaissance of Birth Control
    Duration: 44min | 30/03/2018

    Let's talk about sex, baby. Wait, minus the baby. This month, we interviewed a science historian and a current provider, as well as our friends and family, to learn about the scientific and cultural factors that shape contraceptive use in the US.

  • Rx Friendship: Treating the social deficits in schizophrenia
    Rx Friendship: Treating the social deficits in schizophrenia
    Duration: 20min | 01/03/2018

    Forming strong social relationships with others is critical to our mental health and well-being. But what happens when our ability to form these vital connections is impaired? In this episode, Dr. Josh Woolley explores the social deficits in patients with Schizophrenia, and how oxytocin may hold the key to developing a better treatment.

  • Extending the Thread of Life with Dena Dubal
    Extending the Thread of Life with Dena Dubal
    Duration: 24min | 22/01/2018

    If you could swallow a pill that would give you twenty extra years of healthy life, would you do it? In this episode of CTOR, we talk to Dr. Dena Dubal, a neurologist and neuroscientist at UCSF. Her research on a protein discovered completely by accident may hold the key to living longer, healthier lives more resilient to heart disease, Alzheimer’s disease, and dementia. How is that possible? Listen to this month’s CTOR episode to find out!

  • Jazz Bands and MRI Scans: How brains are creative
    Jazz Bands and MRI Scans: How brains are creative
    Duration: 20min | 07/12/2017

    Have you ever wondered what’s going on in a musician’s head while they improvise? In our latest episode, Dr. Charles Limb gives us a window to peer into the process of creativity as it happens: scanning the brains of jazz musicians and rappers as they improvise. Tune in to learn what brain processes allow creative thought, why creativity matters, and whether or not you might compose the next great rock ballad.

  • Honey, I Shrunk the Data
    Honey, I Shrunk the Data
    Duration: 20min | 31/10/2017

    The world’s data are stored on millions of computers, or servers, that take up buildings’ worth of space and consume about as much electricity as France. How do we keep up with the increasing amount of data that we are generating? In this episode, we talk to bioinformatician Dina Zielinski about her unexpected solution: storing digital data on DNA.

  • Your Brain on Music
    Your Brain on Music
    Duration: 38min | 20/09/2017

    Carry The One Radio goes live, at the California Academy of Sciences. We talk sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll with Dr. Indre Viskontas, a Neuroscientist and Opera singer, at Nightlife: Brain and Body. Hear why the music industry is obsessed with your brain, why drug addicts often die in hotel rooms, and why "The Wheels on the Bus" becomes intensely annoying as you grow up.

  • Free Will! at the Disco
    Free Will! at the Disco
    Duration: 23min | 02/08/2017

    How does a three pound ball of flesh inside your skull lead to your thoughts, your hopes, your feelings...and your sweet dance moves? There are more cells in your brain than there are people on Earth. Billions of neurons making trillions of connections. Trying to figure out how your brain works would be like trying to understand every conversation that’s going on in the world, all at one time…ten times over! So how can we tackle this monumental task? Most scientists simplify the problem by focusing on a single part of the brain, but what if we took a different path? What if we could understand everything that’s going on in a brain, all at the same time? In this episode, Saul Kato explains how he’s doing just that.

  • The Hidden Addiction
    The Hidden Addiction
    Duration: 34min | 15/06/2017

    From the basic biology to public policy: in this episode we tackle sugar. Find out what happens in our bodies when we eat sugar, as well as the disturbing tactics corporations use to get people hooked on products like soda and junk food. We then talk about soda taxes and other strategies Dr. Laura Schmidt and her colleagues are using to battle against the sugar industry.

  • Does Ebola hide in Snakes?
    Does Ebola hide in Snakes?
    Duration: 26min | 04/05/2017

    In this episode, we chat with Dr. Joe DeRisi, UCSF’s resident Sherlock Holmes of infectious diseases. You’ll hear about a surprising discovery that could have enormous implications for controlling - or even preventing - future Ebola outbreaks. One of the big mysteries surrounding Ebola has been where it hides between outbreaks. Here, Dr. DeRisi uncovers an unexpected culprit that could be harboring this deadly virus.

  • Clinical Trials and Tribulations: Steve Hausers quest to cure MS
    Clinical Trials and Tribulations: Steve Hauser's quest to cure MS
    Duration: 38min | 17/04/2017

    In this episode, a team of researchers disprove a decades-old dogma. The result? The first ever FDA-approved drug for primary-progressive multiple sclerosis. In this inspiring story spanning decades of research, you’ll hear all the science, and all the dramatic twists, behind this radical new treatment. For more information and links to the music used in this episode, please visit ctoradio.org

  • Building Breasts and Brains from the Bottom Up
    Building Breasts and Brains from the Bottom Up
    Duration: 21min | 01/03/2017

    Scientists usually study biology in animals such as lab rats, but their discoveries do not always translate between species. What if we could study human biology specifically? In this episode, we talk to Dr. Jurgen Knoblich and Dr. Zev Gartner about their efforts to create organoids, which are miniature, simplified versions of organs created from human cells. Using these organoids, Drs. Knoblich and Gartner can study how human organs develop and how they are affected by disease. How do they make these organoids, and what will organoids mean for our future health?

  • How the bat brain knows its place
    How the bat brain knows its place
    Duration: 19min | 11/01/2017

    Have you ever spaced out while traveling somewhere but still made it to your desintation effortlessly? Our brain is amazing at calculating exactly where we are relative to things around us, but this is a skill we often take for granted. In this episode, Producer Sama Ahmed talks with Dr. Michael Yartsev about how we know where we are in the world, how we make memories, and how we make decisions. Dr. Yartsev is uncovering all of this utilizing a rather unconventional and totally awesome animal: the bat! This episode is a re-release of an episode from 2013.

  • Science against the clock: short talks to ignite your curiosity
    Science against the clock: short talks to ignite your curiosity
    Duration: 37min | 09/12/2016

    In this episode we bring you short talks from ten young, passionate scientists eager to tell you about their cutting-edge discoveries. Each scientist is given just three minutes to launch their audience to new horizons and bring them back to earth, ready for the next exciting journey. Come with us as we explore new horizons in disease prevention, ways that our bodies could one day produce their own treatments, how scary spiders can actually help us reduce pain, and much, much more. Intrigued? Let's begin our countdown to science!

  • Lights, Blights, and Deathly Insights: close encounters of the fungal kind
    Lights, Blights, and Deathly Insights: close encounters of the fungal kind
    Duration: 49min | 07/11/2016

    In this episode we’ll explore humanity’s, and the entire animal kingdom’s, fraught relationship with its closest biological cousins, fungi. We will hear about how we can’t live without them, how they’re trying to wipe us off the face of the planet, and how at least one company thinks they’re the key to changing how we view our own mortality. This one of our largest single episodes, comprised of four parts! First, Dr. Dennis Desjardin of San Francisco State University will tell us about his lifelong relationship with fungi and some of the bizarre organisms he has discovered. Next, we’ll talk to Dr. Margo Daub of North Carolina State University about a deadly pathogen that threatens our food security. Third, we will hear from Dr. Anita Sil of UCSF about a deadly fungus that uses our own immune system against us, and finally, Claire McNamara from the startup Coeio will explain how their product can leverage the power of fungi to create a radical shift in our view on death.

  • How to Build a Human: Part 3
    How to Build a Human: Part 3
    Duration: 23min | 04/10/2016

    In this episode we bring back Professor Terrence Deacon, a biological anthropologist at the University of California, Berkeley, to talk about language. He tells us one possible story of how language first evolved, and why he believes language is a uniquely human capability. Listen to find out how language is about a lot more than just speech.

  • How to Build a Human: Part 2
    How to Build a Human: Part 2
    Duration: 25min | 08/08/2016

    In Part 2 of “How to Build a Human”, we continue our investigation of our unique features that set us apart from other animals. We spoke to Dr. Nathan Young from the University of California San Francisco, who studies the development of the human skeleton and looks at how the variations in our skeletal structure have contributed to our evolution and the development of human civilization.

  • How to Build a Human: Part 1
    How to Build a Human: Part 1
    Duration: 37min | 12/07/2016

    We humans like to think of ourselves as pretty different from other animals. Language, philosophy, art, technology - we do things it seems like no other animal is capable of. But what makes us this way? In part one of our investigation, we focus on two features of the brain that seem to be particular to people. We start with Arnold Kriegstein of the University of California, San Francisco, who studies a type of stem cell that does something special during human brain development. We then turn to Kira Poskanzer and Anna Molofsky, also of UCSF, who believe the secret to human-ness might lie with a totally different, often neglected kind of brain cell.

  • So What? A taste of the scientific process, with Charles Zuker
    So What? A taste of the scientific process, with Charles Zuker
    Duration: 21min | 07/06/2016

    Science journalism generally focuses on new discoveries. But this leaves out a part of the process that will make or break you as a scientist: how do you come up with the right questions to ask in the first place? In today’s episode, we talk to Charles Zuker of Columbia University about this process. Listen to find out the two questions he asks to determine whether an experiment is worth doing.

  • Cracking The Autism Code With Matt State
    Cracking The Autism Code With Matt State
    Duration: 29min | 02/05/2016

    Our ability to diagnose and treat disorders of the mind lags far behind other medical disciplines. For our latest episode, we talked to Dr. Matthew State about why this is the case, and discussed how his research into the genetics of autism is revealing promising paths to future treatments.

  • My Little Thesis
    My Little Thesis
    Duration: 20min | 05/04/2016

    Ready to get blasted with science? We recorded five different PhD students as they summarized their entire thesis in 3 minutes or less. The challenge was to describe their research with as little jargon as possible, for a general audience. You’ll hear about everything from cancer, to the developing embryo, to how dieting might make you smarter.

  • Origins
    Origins
    Duration: 23min | 01/03/2016

    Humankind is fascinated by origin stories. We find them everywhere and they come in many forms... every religion has one, science has lots, they're in biographies, and they're even in superhero movies. In this episode, Dr. Terry Deacon, a biological anthropologist at UC Berkeley, guides us through a novel perspective on how life itself might have started. Music Attribution: Constellation - Podington Bear Dreamlike - Kevin Macleod Erratum: Soccer balls have both hexagons and pentagons!

  • Me, Myself  My Microbiome
    Me, Myself & My Microbiome
    Duration: 24min | 04/02/2016

    On average, five pounds of our body weight is made up of bacteria. But what are they doing there? Do they keep us healthy, make us sick, or are they just along for the ride? In this two-part episode, we will explore the mysterious and complex function of these microscopic critters that collectively make up our micro biome. In part 1, we talk with Katie Pollard, a UCSF professor who studies the microbiome. Katie explains the current state of microbiome research and how critical her work is to forming appropriate conclusions about the relationship between our microbial ecosystem and disease. In part 2, we take a plunge into a man's toilet bowl! (Not-so-average) Joe Hiatt shares an audio diary of his experiences with two extreme diets and the changes he sees in his microbiome. Join him as he chronicles both his bathroom habits along with his microbial diversity.

  • 67: CTOR Bites - Taste and Taste-ability
    67: CTOR Bites - Taste and Taste-ability
    Duration: 11min | 05/01/2016

    For our fourth and most delicious Bite yet, we take a journey through the five basic tastes guided by Dr. Gary Beauchamp. Together we investigate why the things that we eat and drink have different tastes, and what it means to taste something in the first place.

  • CTOR Bites - Episode 3 - THE FOG AT BAY with Dr. Felicia De La Garza Mercer
    CTOR Bites - Episode 3 - THE FOG AT BAY with Dr. Felicia De La Garza Mercer
    Duration: 06min | 16/11/2015

    Our latest Bite introduces 'The Fog at Bay' - a new series of personal mental health stories from academia and medicine. In this crossover episode, Dr. Felicia De La Garza Mercer discusses stress and burnout in the student population. The Fog at Bay's complete first season is out now and features the voices of our graduate and medical school peers, as well as faculty. Stories touch on topics such as bipolar disorder, depression, and concussions. Catch it all on thefogatbay.com, itunes, facebook, or soundcloud.

  • 65: The Enemy of my Enemy
    65: The Enemy of my Enemy
    Duration: 31min | 03/11/2015

    In this episode, we learn about the war going on inside our bodies every day. We generally think of our immune systems as defending us from malicious, foreign attackers. But, as always with biology, we’re finding that it’s not that simple. In some cases, an apparent foe might turn out to be a friend, and vice versa. Here we bring you three different stories about how the immune system can be outsmarted, misdirected, and even re-engineered.

  • 64: CTOR Bites - Good Vibrations: Love Songs from a Fly
    64: CTOR Bites - Good Vibrations: Love Songs from a Fly
    Duration: 07min | 08/10/2015

    For our second Bite, we sit down with Dr. Mala Murthy, a professor at Princeton University, who uses fruit fly songs to answer difficult questions about how flies can respond dynamically to changing environments and how their brains are wired to carry out these behaviors. You can hear the (quiet) low-frequency humming and purring of the fly song in some of the quiet sections of the episode! Produced by Sam Ancona Esselmann with editing help from Meryl Horn

  • 63: CTOR Bites -Sama Ahmed Three Minute Thesis
    63: CTOR Bites -Sama Ahmed Three Minute Thesis
    Duration: 04min | 12/08/2015

    In this brand new CTOR Bite, we take a listen to Carry The One Radio’s own Sama Ahmed as he summarizes 5 years of his research on evolutionary biology into exactly 3 minutes! It’s an adaptation of his award-winning entry into the University of California competition. Enjoy and as always, stay curious.

  • 62: Brain Meets Word
    62: Brain Meets Word
    Duration: 26min | 07/07/2015

    “Brain Meets Word: The Neuroscience Behind Communication” Tongues, songbirds and perfect fifths, oh my! Seemingly disparate subjects yes, but remarkably similar nonetheless. In this episode, we investigate some of the far corners of the neuroscience behind communication! We start with a simple question: how does the human brain coordinate all of the muscles that allow us to speak? In part 2, we learn how male songbirds perfect their mating calls and how all the single birds respond. And finally, a neuroscientist/professional opera-singer tells us about the mystery of musicality, and the science behind becoming a great musician. Part One: “On the Tip of My Tongue” The human brain precisely controls numerous muscles when we speak, but scientists know very little about how exactly this happens... Our producers Ryan Jones and Kate Woronowicz talk with David Conant, a doctoral student in Dr. Edward Chang’s lab at the University of California - San Francisco, about how patients with epilepsy are helping us unra

  • 61: HIV - The Sneaky Intruder
    61: HIV - The Sneaky Intruder
    Duration: 11min | 04/02/2015

    Each summer, The Gladstone Institutes places high school students in some of the best labs for the study of heart disease, brain disorders, virology and immunology. The students work alongside scientists where they learn to conduct cutting-edge experiments, This past summer, we teamed up with Gladstone to mentor two of the students, Hanan Sinada and Kainat Shaikh. After their day in the lab, they met with our producers Kate Woronowicz and Yelena Kulik to learn how to create a podcast episode about their experience. Today’s episode is written and produced by Kainat, a student at Burton High School. Kainat shares what she learned about HIV, what she called “The Sneaky Intruder".

  • 60: Hope for Traumatic Brain Injury
    60: Hope for Traumatic Brain Injury
    Duration: 20min | 15/01/2015

    Dr. Susanna Rosi (UCSF) on how traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects brain function, and the search for new treatments for TBI patients. The brain is an astonishingly complex organ. Injury to the brain in the form of traumatic brain injury (TBI) can cause learning and memory problems in the short-term and dementia in the long-term. Over 1.7 million individuals experience TBI in the United States every year. Unfortunately, there are currently only symptomatic treatments for TBIs. We talked to Dr. Susanna Rosi, Associate Professor at UCSF, about her research into new treatments for TBIs.

  • 59: Evading the Immune System
    59: Evading the Immune System
    Duration: 08min | 18/11/2014

    Although our immune system is amazing at what it does, there are complex cases where the it fails us. Everyday, our bodies fight off hordes of bacteria and viruses that cause disease. When fighting cancer, our bodies even face their own cells that have gone rogue. However, certain pathogens and cancers manage to circumvent our immune system.

  • 58: Developing the Germ Cell
    58: Developing the Germ Cell
    Duration: 12min | 02/10/2014

    Cells are the building blocks of life…and need to be transformed into the various tissues that make up our body. There are two main populations of cells that are programmed by a variety of biochemical forces to acquire the characteristics of different cell types in the body. One population, called the somatic cells, is eventually transformed into skin, muscle, bones and such. The other population, called germ cells, becomes sperm and eggs. In today’s episode, Karuna Meda interviews Dr. Nam Tran (UCSF) about his research on germ cell development and its importance for understanding fertility.

  • Trends in Translational Medicine 06: Large-scale Institutional Research just got Easier
    Trends in Translational Medicine 06: Large-scale Institutional Research just got Easier
    Duration: 05min | 01/09/2014

    Under the banner of “Accelerating Research to Improve Health,” the Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) at the University of California, San Francisco -- the leading university exclusively focused on health -- is part of a shift in biomedical research. This move involves a focus on translational, or bench-to-bedside research, which aims to “translate” biomedical discoveries into useful applications and treatments, such as a drug, device, diagnostic or behavioral intervention, that improves human health and health outcomes. This podcast series is presented by the CTSI and Carry the One Radio – the Science Podcast. CTSI is funded by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences at the National Institutes of Health. This series was written and produced by Sama Ahmed and Karuna Meda, and edited by John Daigre and Carly Van Orsdel. Learn more at ctsi.ucsf.edu or www.ctoradio.org

  • Trends in Translational Medicine 05: Big Data for Health - Sharing is a Good Thing
    Trends in Translational Medicine 05: Big Data for Health - Sharing is a Good Thing
    Duration: 06min | 01/09/2014

    Under the banner of “Accelerating Research to Improve Health,” the Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) at the University of California, San Francisco -- the leading university exclusively focused on health -- is part of a shift in biomedical research. This move involves a focus on translational, or bench-to-bedside research, which aims to “translate” biomedical discoveries into useful applications and treatments, such as a drug, device, diagnostic or behavioral intervention, that improves human health and health outcomes. This podcast series is presented by the CTSI and Carry the One Radio – the Science Podcast. CTSI is funded by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences at the National Institutes of Health. This series was written and produced by Sama Ahmed and Karuna Meda, and edited by John Daigre and Carly Van Orsdel. Learn more at ctsi.ucsf.edu or www.ctoradio.org

  • Trends in Translational Medicine 04: Online Learning meets the Old-fashioned Classroom
    Trends in Translational Medicine 04: Online Learning meets the Old-fashioned Classroom
    Duration: 05min | 01/09/2014

    Under the banner of “Accelerating Research to Improve Health,” the Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) at the University of California, San Francisco -- the leading university exclusively focused on health -- is part of a shift in biomedical research. This move involves a focus on translational, or bench-to-bedside research, which aims to “translate” biomedical discoveries into useful applications and treatments, such as a drug, device, diagnostic or behavioral intervention, that improves human health and health outcomes. This podcast series is presented by the CTSI and Carry the One Radio – the Science Podcast. CTSI is funded by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences at the National Institutes of Health. This series was written and produced by Sama Ahmed and Karuna Meda, and edited by John Daigre and Carly Van Orsdel. Learn more at ctsi.ucsf.edu or www.ctoradio.org

  • Trends in Translational Medicine 03: Internet-enabled Clinical Research - Going Big
    Trends in Translational Medicine 03: Internet-enabled Clinical Research - Going Big
    Duration: 07min | 01/09/2014

    Under the banner of “Accelerating Research to Improve Health,” the Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) at the University of California, San Francisco -- the leading university exclusively focused on health -- is part of a shift in biomedical research. This move involves a focus on translational, or bench-to-bedside research, which aims to “translate” biomedical discoveries into useful applications and treatments, such as a drug, device, diagnostic or behavioral intervention, that improves human health and health outcomes. This podcast series is presented by the CTSI and Carry the One Radio – the Science Podcast. CTSI is funded by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences at the National Institutes of Health. This series was written and produced by Sama Ahmed and Karuna Meda, and edited by John Daigre and Carly Van Orsdel. Learn more at ctsi.ucsf.edu or www.ctoradio.org

  • Trends in Translational Medicine 02: Team Science - The Revolution
    Trends in Translational Medicine 02: Team Science - The Revolution
    Duration: 08min | 01/09/2014

    Under the banner of “Accelerating Research to Improve Health,” the Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) at the University of California, San Francisco -- the leading university exclusively focused on health -- is part of a shift in biomedical research. This move involves a focus on translational, or bench-to-bedside research, which aims to “translate” biomedical discoveries into useful applications and treatments, such as a drug, device, diagnostic or behavioral intervention, that improves human health and health outcomes. This podcast series is presented by the CTSI and Carry the One Radio – the Science Podcast. CTSI is funded by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences at the National Institutes of Health. This series was written and produced by Sama Ahmed and Karuna Meda, and edited by John Daigre and Carly Van Orsdel. Learn more at ctsi.ucsf.edu or www.ctoradio.org

  • Trends in Translational Medicine 01: Academic-Industry Partnerships
    Trends in Translational Medicine 01: Academic-Industry Partnerships
    Duration: 08min | 01/09/2014

    Under the banner of “Accelerating Research to Improve Health,” the Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) at the University of California, San Francisco -- the leading university exclusively focused on health -- is part of a shift in biomedical research. This move involves a focus on translational, or bench-to-bedside research, which aims to “translate” biomedical discoveries into useful applications and treatments, such as a drug, device, diagnostic or behavioral intervention, that improves human health and health outcomes. This podcast series is presented by the CTSI and Carry the One Radio – the Science Podcast. CTSI is funded by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences at the National Institutes of Health. This series was written and produced by Sama Ahmed and Karuna Meda, and edited by John Daigre and Carly Van Orsdel. Learn more at ctsi.ucsf.edu or www.ctoradio.org

  • 57: The Neuroscience of Pacific Rim (Hosted by Keith Foster)
    57: The Neuroscience of Pacific Rim (Hosted by Keith Foster)
    Duration: 34min | 15/08/2014

    Keith Foster, leader of the funk band “Big Pimp Jones”, invites CTOR’s host, Sama Ahmed, to talk about the neuroscience of the giant-monster movie, Pacific Rim. Sama in turn calls up his neuroengineering friend, Joey Martinez, from the University of Utah to tag team this issue. Guest: Sama Ahmed (CTOR/UCSF) and Joan Martinez (University of Utah) Host: Keith Foster (Nerdometrics)

  • 56: Failing Frontal Lobes (Long Version)
    56: Failing Frontal Lobes (Long Version)
    Duration: 23min | 01/08/2014

    A neurologist discusses a rare form of dementia with symptoms like over-eating, criminality, and financial irresponsibility Producer: Amanda Mason Guest: Dr. Bruce Miller, UCSF

  • 56: Failing Frontal Lobes (Short Version)
    56: Failing Frontal Lobes (Short Version)
    Duration: 15min | 01/08/2014

    A neurologist discusses a rare form of dementia with symptoms like over-eating, criminality, and financial irresponsibility Producer: Amanda Mason Guest: Dr. Bruce Miller, UCSF

  • 55: Sound Off (Part 3) - Love Songs of a Spider (Hosted by Dr. Kiki)
    55: Sound Off (Part 3) - Love Songs of a Spider (Hosted by Dr. Kiki)
    Duration: 13min | 02/07/2014

    Dr. Kiki (This Week in Science) interviews Erin Brandt about how jumping spiders sing and dance to woo mates. Audio/Video by Austin Chou and Ben Cohn This is the last of a three-part series from "Sound Off!”, Carry the One Radio’s first live show, which took place at UCSF on May 29, 2014.

  • 54: Sound Off (Part 2) - Auditory Feedback and The Donald Duck Treatment (Hosted by Dr. Kiki)
    54: Sound Off (Part 2) - Auditory Feedback and The Donald Duck Treatment (Hosted by Dr. Kiki)
    Duration: 15min | 15/06/2014

    Dr. Kiki (This Week in Science) interviews Dr. John Houde about how changing what the brain hears can alter what it says. The two discuss how fooling the brain into thinking you sound like Donald Duck can be an effective treatment for people who speak with a stutter. Guest: Dr. John Houde, University of California - San Francisco Host: Dr. Kiki Sanford (This Week in Science) Audio/Video by Austin Chou and Ben Cohn This is the second of a three-part series from "Sound Off!”, Carry the One Radio’s first live show, which took place at UCSF on May 29, 2014.

  • 53: Sound Off (Part 1) - Noisy Birds and Giggling Hyenas (Hosted by Dr Kiki)
    53: Sound Off (Part 1) - Noisy Birds and Giggling Hyenas (Hosted by Dr Kiki)
    Duration: 23min | 02/06/2014

    Dr. Kiki (This Week in Science) interviews Dr. Frederic Theunissen. The two talk about his research on sound communication in social birds and hyenas Guest: Dr. Frederic Theunissen, University of California - San Francisco This is the first of a three-part series from "Sound Off!”, Carry the One Radio’s first live show, which took place at UCSF on May 29, 2014.

  • 52: Massive issues
    52: Massive issues
    Duration: 07min | 15/05/2014

    Dr. Brian Koberlein explains the different kinds of mass, and their importance for studying the cosmos.

  • 51: Carry the One Radio takes on Goggles Optional
    51: Carry the One Radio takes on Goggles Optional
    Duration: 42min | 01/05/2014

    It’s a UCSF vs Stanford showdown, plus science discussions on evolution and fruit fly research. This episode is a co-broadcast of Goggles Optional Episode 26 (www.gogglesoptional.com)

  • 50: Getting In Touch With Emotions
    50: Getting In Touch With Emotions
    Duration: 08min | 15/04/2014

    How good are we at communicating through touch alone?

  • 49: Run! For Your Neurons
    49: Run! For Your Neurons
    Duration: 10min | 01/04/2014

    A neuroscientist examines how exercise may increase the production of new brain cells in adults

  • 48: Chimeras Are People Too
    48: Chimeras Are People Too
    Duration: 06min | 15/03/2014

    Science is teaching us that we are not always who we think we are. www.patreon.com/carrytheone

  • How neurons talk to each other - the synapse and more: Dr. Susan Voglmaier, UCSF
    How neurons talk to each other - the synapse and more: Dr. Susan Voglmaier, UCSF
    Duration: 12min | 01/03/2014

    A psychiatrist studies the cellular machinery that drives synaptic transmission

  • CTOR Short: The Cat Who Broke his Sweet Tooth
    CTOR Short: The Cat Who Broke his Sweet Tooth
    Duration: 07min | 15/02/2014

    A genetic exploration of why cats can not taste sweet foods

  • Tapping into the Brains Avoidance Centers: Dr. Garret Stuber, UNC Chapel Hill
    Tapping into the Brain's Avoidance Centers: Dr. Garret Stuber, UNC Chapel Hill
    Duration: 09min | 01/02/2014

    A neuroscientist manipulates a tiny brain region that controls avoidance behavior To support the show: www.patreon.com/carrytheone

  • Speaking with the Lizard Man: Dr. Eric Pianka, UT-Austin
    Speaking with the Lizard Man: Dr. Eric Pianka, UT-Austin
    Duration: 44min | 01/01/2014

    A biologist speaks about his life on the desert, his mentors, his bazooka accident, and lizards. Our host, Adrian Smith, is an ant biologist at the University of Illinois. He runs his own science podcast called The Age of Discovery (aodpod.com). Donate to CTOR: patreon.com/carrytheone

  • Pulling DNA: Dr. Sophie Dumont, UCSF
    Pulling DNA: Dr. Sophie Dumont, UCSF
    Duration: 14min | 02/12/2013

    A biophysicist studies the microscopic machinery that pulls chromosomes apart during cell division

  • Exploring the Zombie Brain: Dr. Brad Voytek, UCSD
    Exploring the Zombie Brain: Dr. Brad Voytek, UCSD
    Duration: 21min | 31/10/2013

    A neuroscientist uses the zombie brain as a springboard for teaching.

  • The big role of microRNAs in the immune system: Dr. Mark Ansel, UCSF
    The big role of microRNAs in the immune system: Dr. Mark Ansel, UCSF
    Duration: 17min | 01/10/2013

    An immunologist studies microRNAs

  • How to become a heart cell: Dr. Benoit Bruneau, Gladstone Institute for Cardiovascular Disease
    How to become a heart cell: Dr. Benoit Bruneau, Gladstone Institute for Cardiovascular Disease
    Duration: 11min | 02/09/2013

    An epigeneticist studies how the heart is formed

  •  The surprising health benefits of Botox: Dr. Edwin Chapman (Part 2), University of Wisconsin - Madison and HHMI
    The surprising health benefits of Botox: Dr. Edwin Chapman (Part 2), University of Wisconsin - Madison and HHMI
    Duration: 13min | 15/08/2013

    A neurobiologist discusses the medical uses of Botulinum Toxin A

  • The cells fusion machinery: Dr. Edwin Chapman (Part 1), University of Wisconsin-Madison and HHMI
    The cell's fusion machinery: Dr. Edwin Chapman (Part 1), University of Wisconsin-Madison and HHMI
    Duration: 12min | 01/08/2013

    A neurobiologist discusses the machinery that allows neurons to communicate

  • Evolution of the deer mouse: Dr. Hopi Hoekstra, Harvard University
    Evolution of the deer mouse: Dr. Hopi Hoekstra, Harvard University
    Duration: 13min | 01/07/2013

    An evolutionary geneticist studies how animals adapt to their environments

  • How the bat brain knows its place: Dr. Michael Yartsev, Princeton Neuroscience Institute
    How the bat brain knows its place: Dr. Michael Yartsev, Princeton Neuroscience Institute
    Duration: 18min | 01/06/2013

    A neuroscientist uses bats to understand how the brain represents the 3D world

  • Our protective microbiome: Dr. Susan Lynch, UCSF
    Our protective microbiome: Dr. Susan Lynch, UCSF
    Duration: 18min | 01/05/2013

    A microbial ecologist discusses the vibrant ecosystem known as the human body.

  • Exploring the evolution and development of the vertebrate skeleton: Dr. Richard Schneider, UCSF
    Exploring the evolution and development of the vertebrate skeleton: Dr. Richard Schneider, UCSF
    Duration: 11min | 01/04/2013

    A developmental biologist studies cellular mechanisms that form the head and face.

  • Neural circuits and motivational processes underlying hunger: Dr. Scott Sternson, Janelia Farm Research Campus
    Neural circuits and motivational processes underlying hunger: Dr. Scott Sternson, Janelia Farm Research Campus
    Duration: 14min | 01/03/2013

    A chemist turned neuroscientist maps the motivational state of hunger

  • Towards personalized cancer treatments: Dr. Eric Collisson and Dr. Barry Taylor, UCSF
    Towards personalized cancer treatments: Dr. Eric Collisson and Dr. Barry Taylor, UCSF
    Duration: 24min | 01/02/2013

    An oncologist and a computational biologist team up to treat cancer.

  • How does the brain motivate us to move?: Dr. Anatol Kreitzer, UCSF/Gladstone
    How does the brain motivate us to move?: Dr. Anatol Kreitzer, UCSF/Gladstone
    Duration: 13min | 01/01/2013

    A neuroscientist studies how diseases of the brain affect motivation and the body's ability to move.

  • How the brain stays stable in a changing world_ Dr. Graeme Davis, UCSF
    How the brain stays stable in a changing world_ Dr. Graeme Davis, UCSF
    Duration: 16min | 01/12/2012

    A neuroscientist studies the brain's homeostat.

  • Energy balance in a changing environment: Dr. Kaveh Ashrafi, UCSF
    Energy balance in a changing environment: Dr. Kaveh Ashrafi, UCSF
    Duration: 25min | 01/11/2012

    A neuroscientist studies how a worm's brain regulates feeding.

  • The neighborhood of cells in breast cancer: Dr. Zena Werb, UCSF
    The neighborhood of cells in breast cancer: Dr. Zena Werb, UCSF
    Duration: 15min | 01/10/2012

    A cancer biologist discusses the breast cancer and the cellular neighborhood

  • Treating Chagas Disease: Dr. Jim McKerrow, UCSF
    Treating Chagas Disease: Dr. Jim McKerrow, UCSF
    Duration: 16min | 05/09/2012

    A pathologist studies a neglected tropical disease

  • How the brain responds to pheromones: Dr. Lisa Stowers, Scripps Research Institute
    How the brain responds to pheromones: Dr. Lisa Stowers, Scripps Research Institute
    Duration: 13min | 31/07/2012

    A neuroscientist works on how the brain processes pheromones

  • The Social Worm: Dr. Cori Bargmann, Rockefeller University and HHMI
    The Social Worm: Dr. Cori Bargmann, Rockefeller University and HHMI
    Duration: 13min | 30/06/2012

    A neurobiologist studies social behaviors and neuromodulation

  • Regenerating the heart: Dr. Deepak Srivastava, Gladstone Institute of Cardiovascular Disease
    Regenerating the heart: Dr. Deepak Srivastava, Gladstone Institute of Cardiovascular Disease
    Duration: 08min | 03/06/2012

    A cardiologist studies stem cells and heart development

  • Stem Cells and Epigenetics: Dr. Barbara Panning, UCSF
    Stem Cells and Epigenetics: Dr. Barbara Panning, UCSF
    Duration: 12min | 01/05/2012

    An epigeneticist discusses RNA interference

  • Mef2A and muscle regeneration: Christine Snyder, Boston University
    Mef2A and muscle regeneration: Christine Snyder, Boston University
    Duration: 16min | 05/08/2011

    A young scientist discusses her thesis work on muscle development

  • Chronic pain is a disease: Dr. Allan Basbaum, UCSF
    Chronic pain is a disease: Dr. Allan Basbaum, UCSF
    Duration: 15min | 01/07/2011

    A neuroscientist discusses the disease of pain

  • Makings of a memory: Dr. Loren Frank, UCSF
    Makings of a memory: Dr. Loren Frank, UCSF
    Duration: 14min | 01/06/2011

    A neuroscientist tackles memory formation

  • Mapping the brains blood vessels: Dr. David Kleinfeld, UC San Diego
    Mapping the brain's blood vessels: Dr. David Kleinfeld, UC San Diego
    Duration: 12min | 02/05/2011

    A neurophysicist maps out the brains blood network

  • How the brain maps what it sees and hears: Jason Triplett, UC- Santa Cruz
    How the brain maps what it sees and hears: Jason Triplett, UC- Santa Cruz
    Duration: 12min | 01/04/2011

    A neuroscientist questions how the brain matches what we see and hear

  • Studying the Retinal Ganglion Cells: Dr. Andrew Huberman, UCSD
    Studying the Retinal Ganglion Cells: Dr. Andrew Huberman, UCSD
    Duration: 13min | 23/12/2010

    A neuroscientist studies the visual system

  • How neurons navigate their way around in the developing brain: Dr. David Van Vactor, Harvard University
    How neurons navigate their way around in the developing brain: Dr. David Van Vactor, Harvard University
    Duration: 12min | 09/12/2010

    A developmental biologist studies how neurons in the fly brain find their way

  • What fruit flies can tell us about alcohol addiction: Dr. Ulrike Heberlein, UCSF
    What fruit flies can tell us about alcohol addiction: Dr. Ulrike Heberlein, UCSF
    Duration: 11min | 16/05/2010

    A neuroscientist studies alcohol addiction in fruit flies

  • How your brain tells time: Dr. Michael Shadlen, University of Washington/HHMI
    How your brain tells time: Dr. Michael Shadlen, University of Washington/HHMI
    Duration: 12min | 05/05/2010

    A neuroscientist studies timing in the brain

  • Dapper in the brain: Dr. Benjamin Cheyette, UCSF
    Dapper in the brain: Dr. Benjamin Cheyette, UCSF
    Duration: 11min | 16/04/2010

    A psychiatrist studies genes that shape the brain

  • Repression of Olfactory Receptor Genes: Dr. Stavros Lomvardas, UCSF
    Repression of Olfactory Receptor Genes: Dr. Stavros Lomvardas, UCSF
    Duration: 11min | 07/04/2010

    A molecular biologist studies how our sense of smell is determined

  • Memory of a relapse: Patricia Janak, UCSF/Gallo
    Memory of a relapse: Patricia Janak, UCSF/Gallo
    Duration: 10min | 18/03/2010

    A neuroscientist studies why alcoholics relapse

  • Local neural networks associated with flexible behaviors: Dr. Takaki Komiyama, Janelia Farms
    Local neural networks associated with flexible behaviors: Dr. Takaki Komiyama, Janelia Farms
    Duration: 09min | 03/03/2010

    A neuroscientist looks at how the brain allows for flexible behaviors

  • The genetics of morning larks: Dr. Louis Ptacek, HHMI/UCSF
    The genetics of morning larks: Dr. Louis Ptacek, HHMI/UCSF
    Duration: 11min | 17/02/2010

    A neuroscientist discusses the genetics of morning larks.

  • The meninges help the brain develop: Dr. Sam Pleasure, UCSF
    The meninges help the brain develop: Dr. Sam Pleasure, UCSF
    Duration: 11min | 04/02/2010

    A neuroscientist discusses brain development.

  • Ignoring distractions helps you remember better: Dr. Adam Gazzaley, UCSF
    Ignoring distractions helps you remember better: Dr. Adam Gazzaley, UCSF
    Duration: 12min | 21/01/2010

    A neurologist studies how we pay attention

  • The link between muscle degeneration and mechanosensitive ion channels: Dr. Jeff Lansman, UCSF
    The link between muscle degeneration and mechanosensitive ion channels: Dr. Jeff Lansman, UCSF
    Duration: 10min | 06/01/2010

    A physiologist studies how we sense mechanical stimulation

  • How does the mutation in Huntingtons disease cause neurodegeneration?: Dr. Steve Finkbeiner, UCSF/Gladstone Institute for Neurlogic Disease
    How does the mutation in Huntington's disease cause neurodegeneration?: Dr. Steve Finkbeiner, UCSF/Gladstone Institute for Neurlogic Disease
    Duration: 09min | 23/12/2009

    A neuroscientist digs deep into the genetics of Huntington's Disease

  • Anti-inflammatory properties of extra virgin olive oil: Dr. Paul Breslin, Monell/Rutgers U
    Anti-inflammatory properties of extra virgin olive oil: Dr. Paul Breslin, Monell/Rutgers U
    Duration: 10min | 09/12/2009

    A psychophysicist studies the healthy properties of olive oil

  • How do hormones control sex-specific behaviors?: Dr. Nirao Shah, University of California - San Francisco
    How do hormones control sex-specific behaviors?: Dr. Nirao Shah, University of California - San Francisco
    Duration: 10min | 26/11/2009

    A neuroscientist asks "how do hormones make males and females different?"

  • Figuring out the role of neurons in zebrafish swimming: Dr. Herwig Baier, University of California - San Francisco
    Figuring out the role of neurons in zebrafish swimming: Dr. Herwig Baier, University of California - San Francisco
    Duration: 10min | 11/11/2009

    A neuroscientist studies how how a fish brain controls swimming

  • Finding new ways to diagnose and treat pain: Dr. Beth Winkelstein, University of Pennsylvania
    Finding new ways to diagnose and treat pain: Dr. Beth Winkelstein, University of Pennsylvania
    Duration: 09min | 28/10/2009

    A bioengineer looks for new ways to treat pain

  • Launch Episode: What is Carry the One Radio?
    Launch Episode: What is "Carry the One Radio"?
    Duration: 01min | 28/10/2009

    Started in 2009, Carry The One Radio is a series of short interviews with scientists. The show is run entirely by a small group of dedicated young scientists, mostly graduate students at UCSF, who want to bridge the gap between the scientific community and the general public. We value science education and we encourage teachers and students alike to share our freely available episodes with as many people as possible. Twitter/@CarryThe1Radio Facebook/carrytheone

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